Feb 6 2013

Sketch VS Fireworks

In response to many who have suggested in my blog Sketch VS Photoshop that Fireworks is a great alternative to Sketch, I decided to download it again after many years.

fireworks-ui

First Impressions

In the first few minutes after using the UI, I can tell why everyone has been saying that Adobe neglected this product. It feels very unpolished compared to Photoshop which has a dark sexy, intuitive interface (CS6 is even better). The buttons look completely outdated. The top bar is pretty much useless. The Bitmap tools (marquee, brushes, eraser, etc.) are good for image editing, but they’re just noises for user interface design. You might as well use Photoshop or the cheaper alternative PixelMator for that purpose. Additionally, those tools are just not vector-friendly.

After playing around with the properties on my rounded rectangle, I started to really miss the live editing and the keyboard arrows (up & down) that would allow you to see direct results from your tweaks. Sketch has a really efficient way to adjust the settings and see live results without having the press Enter all the time. Dragging stuff around feels very sluggish compared to Photoshop/Sketch and I work on the latest iMac with 32 GB of RAM.

I was pleased to see that you can apply multiple of the same styles (drop shadows, inner shadows, etc.), but managing them was a pain. The number of clicks/popups that I have to go through is just astounding. Also, for some obscure reason, Adobe feels that the default drop-shadow should be at 315 degree angle and at a 65% opaque black. That basically means that you have to adjust those settings every single time.

fireworks-styles

In the first 5 minutes, the application crashed on me as I wanted to re-arrange my toolbars. That might just be bad luck.

The Export Tool Is Pretty Sweet

You can slice your design and get the html file that contains all the images. I can see why exporting sliced designs can be useful, especially if you don’t want to be bothered with codes.

fireworks-export

But it’s 2013 and most designers stopped relying on images to create simple interfaces. We use CSS now and we love clean codes. Sketch and now Photoshop has a neat feature that allows you to “Copy CSS”, which essentially gives you the CSS equivalent of the properties you have set. It’s useful on occasions, but not truly groundbreaking. That’s until they figure a way to make the codes cleaner (e.g. have multiple styles separated by commas instead of repeating for box-shadow), embed more settings such as border-radius, border, gradient, patterns, text-shadow, etc.

sketch-css

Still Pixel

fireworks-pixel

At the end of the day, what really made me switch to Sketch was the 100% vector direction and how simple the UI is. I care deeply about the number of clicks needed to achieve one task. With Sketch, it just feels like all the properties that I use are there, only when I need them. That’s a sign of a good UI.

sketch-properties

It was a tough decision to switch from Photoshop, but the advantages far outweigh the hurdles. While Fireworks is a decent alternative focused more for Web design, it still carries the same issues that I’ve had in Photoshop. It feels like a tool that was invented when the Web was prominent, before the Mobile era and certainly before retina displays came along. There is no tool in Fireworks that made me think “Hmm, they really thought about this for mobile designers”.

What Is 100% Vector, Really?

Okay, I feel like a lot of people misunderstand what 100% vector really means. Well, let me clarify that. In Photoshop, you have vector shapes, but changing the width will screw the rounded corners. It’s like the application really treats it as an artwork rather than a dynamic shape. In CSS language, if you change the width of your box, it won’t change your border-radius.

Zooming in will show all the pixels, which means that you won’t be able to see how it’ll really look like in 2x and you won’t be able to export to PDF or even print your designs as is. You will always have to set the DPI. It is resolution dependent. In Sketch, all that disappears. Thanks to that, you can do pretty cool stuff like exporting in 2x without creating extra layers.

Sketch does a beautiful job at importing SVG icons from your favorite designers. In fact, I found a pretty neat process that even allows you to import all your Photoshop icons into Sketch. It’s a bit tricky though.

sketch-icons

Finally, because Sketch is vector based, all the layers are compatible with other vector based application such as Keynote. It is perfect for presentation, or designing for print since you won’t have to care about DPI. For example, I was able to redesign my Résumé in a very short time, and that experience was actually enjoyable! My Photoshop experience with designing resumes or business cards was not a good one.

sketch-print

Animation

This is a topic that I’m passionate about and no one has solved it beautifully yet, not even Sketch. I want to be able to animate the transitions in my designs and preview them quickly, anywhere. That would help the process of showing engineers how I’d like my design to be animated. Fireworks, Photoshop and AfterEffects all do that task in their own way, but I never felt compelled to dig deeper for fast prototyping. They just don’t feel natural for what I truly want. It is unfortunate that Sketch has no support for that yet. Perhaps, Sketch shouldn’t and perhaps we need a dedicated app as powerful as Quartz that’s much easier to understand but that can easily animate using physics, ease-in and ease-out by just tweaking the numbers and applying properties and specially made for user interface design. But it’ll be interesting to see how design applications will evolve to fulfill that need.

Price and Support

sketch-pricing

I was surprised to find out that Fireworks actually costs $299. It’s ridiculous considering how little Adobe work on that product anymore. In comparison, Sketch costs $49 and has a small business license for 5 users for only $124. You’ll have to judge it for yourself.

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66 Responses to “Sketch VS Fireworks”

  1. @florianpnn says:

    @_kud Le meilleur compromis Photoshop/Fireworks que j’ai trouvé actuellement : http://t.co/Q8N3WfiG , vraiment puissant au premier abord

  2. Ryan D says:

    It’s really not a fair comparison to take Sketch, something you know all the intricacies of and have used for some time, and Fireworks (a tool you’re a total novice to), which you just downloaded for an hour or so of exploration and apparently know nothing about, and just say one is better than the other.

    Fireworks definitely has it’s problems, but it also has a lot of great strengths that make it very powerful (all of which you missed in this comparison).

  3. Toby K says:

    Seems to me like Illustrator would be a more natural alternative to Sketch. It’s much more polished than Fireworks, has more control over default settings, and is very stable. You can save complex object styles and re-use them easily.

    Sketch does tend to be faster and more intuitive for the type of work we do, but it’s missing something important:

    Sketch has no master pages or Symbols. This is a complete deal breaker if you work with multi-page designs. Many of the apps I design involve a dozen or more pages. Now imagine a client wants to change the header… I’d have to make the change 12+ times (or once and then copy+paste everywhere else, but still)! That undoes any productivity gains I made using the quicker interface, by a big margin.

    I talked to the Sketch team about it and they say they’re working on master pages and symbols. But until they arrive, Illustrator is a great alternative.

  4. Bart says:

    This is not really a review as you don’t compare Fireworks strengths to Sketch’s strengths. Fireworks’ strengths lays into the usage of Symbols, styles and pages and the advanced slicing and export capabilities. Can you create a multi-page document in Sketch (for example a multi-screen mobile design)? Can you export all these screens into one PDF? Does Sketch open Photoshop files (pretty essential feature)? Oh and Fireworks supports CSS styles as well. I’ll go ahead and try Sketch for a couple of weeks to see how they really compare (I’ve been using Fireworks for the past ten years and never touch Photoshop). One thing is sure, Fireworks crashes often. But doesn’t Photoshop crash a lot as well? Isn’t that the definition of Adobe software?

  5. First of all, I love that Sketch is finally getting some attention from the design community. It’s already a really strong tool and I truly believe (given the huge amount of changes the developers did in the last months) it will replace Fireworks and even Photoshop for some UI designers out there.

    However, your comparison between Fireworks and Sketch is missing a few important things (symbols, styles, states, master pages) and you’re wrong about the CSS Export of Fireworks (which exists, it’s not as good as the Sketch export but it’s there). It’s more like you’re comparing Sketch good features with Fireworks’ bad features (still I appreciated your article).

    The only thing that holds me back to really use Sketch for UI design (instead of Fireworks which I’ve used the last 5 years) is the missing live preview of fonts. Sometimes I just don’t know which font I want to use – I wanne browse through my list of fonts and see how the paragraphe I’ve currently selected would look like. A PSD (or even better – a Fireworks png compatibility) would be awesome as well.

  6. Andy says:

    Think you need to give it a bit more time TBH.

    “Still Pixel” – well that’s kinda the point of a UI design tool. Criticising it for lack of retina support isn’t that fair when Adobe clearly don’t care about it, has outsourced development to India and don’t listen to their customers anymore.
    “SVG” – Fireworks can handle vectors copy+pasted from Illustrator.
    You didn’t cover things like copy/paste appearance, symbols, mention the far smaller filesizes/faster loading compared to Photoshop.

    oh and this is life changing http://johndunning.com/fireworks/about/KeyboardResize

    Yes it does crash sometimes, yes the UI is a bit janky but it can handle much more complicated and bigger documents than Sketch can and you can fit it into the Adobe ecosystem easier which makes it a much better choice for anyone in the agency/studio world.

    Anyone with doubts about Fireworks capabilities should also check out the work of http://ivomynttinen.com and his post about Fireworks http://ivomynttinen.com/blog/the-endless-fireworks-vs-photoshop-battle/

  7. @mrrocks says:

    Round 2: Sketch VS Fireworks http://t.co/YkmFOB9s

  8. @KoroPokkuru says:

    Sketch VS Photoshop
    http://t.co/fXrl4YNM
    Sketch VS Fireworks
    http://t.co/xAj9dqKI

  9. @MengTo says:

    Sketch VS Fireworks may not be as popular, but I got more comments pointing out how unfair I was. Replied to all. http://t.co/x60Rffcv

  10. Paul says:

    I’m not sure about this article. I’m a long time Fireworks user and a while ago I tried Sketch: I stopped using it within half an hour because I didn’t like it at all!! Maybe I should try longer, but Sketch is really not that easy and straightforward to use as you try to depict here… once you are used to something, in my case Fireworks, it’s just too much hassle to switch. I’m sure if I would switch to Sketch, I would start to miss many of the great tools that Fireworks offers. And shame on Adobe for not giving more love to Fireworks.

  11. Jim Babbage says:

    Been a FIreworks user for a LONG time and I admit I have not tried Sketch yet, although I have heard of it. Your review of Sketch was impressive enough that I’ll probably download it and give it a test run. However, I am a self-professed FIreworks fan.

    I just wanted to call out a couple points that should be mentioned because of comments about the app being code-friendly or not.

    First, Fireworks CS6 has a CSS properties export panel that wil export out CSS properties for vectors and type. Drop shadows, glows, borders, radii, gradient fills, alpha transparency – all supported.

    If you want to design in a totally non-bitmap workflow, FIreworks has a pretty extensive JQuery Mobile template where you can create your own swatches, custom mobile icons, etc and then – again – the entire template can be exported out as CSS, HTML and JavaScript. The ONLY bitmaps exported (and only if you wish to export them at all) are icons.

    Also worth noting, FIreworks supports CSS alpha transparency (yes it took a while, but in CS6 it finally does).

    For the odd necessary bitmap, FW also supports 8-bit alpha transparency for PNG export. It has since probably the beginning. Perhaps Sketch does as well, I don’t know. But I DO know that Photoshop doesn’t support 8-bit alpha for bitmaps.

    Sprite sheets can also be created quite quickly, with accompanying CSS.

    Scaling vectors is non-destructive in FW. There are several options available in FW to eliminate distortion of rounded rectangles.

    I agree, I’d love that “auto 2x export” option for FW. As it stands, you’d have to generate a duplicate page in FW and increase the overall resolution, then export. Not as elegant, but workable.

    And lastly the HUGE support of a talented developer and design community continues to enhance FW’s feature set and productivity through the independent creation of extensions for Fireworks. Just browse through johndunning.com to see what I mean. An John is by no means the only developer out there building extensions for Fireworks.

  12. Isabel says:

    I really support Sketch and the possibility of using tools other than Adobe’s, but honestly I think here you are biased by this idea more than writing an accurate comparison between the two. :)

    About this:

    “I was pleased to see that you can apply multiple of the same styles (drop shadows, inner shadows, etc.), but managing them was a pain. The number of clicks/popups that I have to go through is just astounding”

    As a vector artist, this is one of the features I use more in my work, and in this style stacking capability lies one of FW’s major strengths for creating awesome vector graphics fast, and with few clicks and tweaks.

    I really care about ease of use and straight forward actions (another reason why I do not even think of using AI for screen illustration), and all I can say is that if not pop-ups, maybe we would be using panels, but, does this really make a big difference? And in any case… would it be better?

    I don’t think so to be honest.

    Said this, I really hope with some time Sketch comes close to Fireworks in its capabilities and ease of use in order to make a final switch if Adobe finally does not wake up with FW.

    Cheers.

  13. Eyal Cagan says:

    You are missing a big strength fireworks have over sketch… it’s work on both Mac and windows based pc, with all the respect to sketch, and to apple, it only relevant to part of us designers, and not to many others, who Don’t own Mac, and my guess, is, until sketch will be windowsable, it will stay an irrelevant niche tool (I will be the first one, to try a new piece of design software, but not if it cost me $2049)

  14. Mathias says:

    Hi Meng To.

    First of all i want to say thanks for showing me Sketch, i have bought it and i love it!

    I just have one question though:
    how do you copy-paste text into a text box and keep the properties you have given.? It insists to keep the format to whatever i copied from

  15. Greg says:

    Just want to clear a few points from your post.

    Regards Fireworks GUI design, the phrase substance over style comes to mind.

    Fireworks is a Bitmap AND vector editing tool, a user can work in either mode on the same canvas with no restrictions.

    Regarding performance, I can still run FW CS6 on my Rev A Macbook air without experiencing the sluggishness you describe.

    Default settings, the drop shadow value defaults to 315 degrees not 375 (which is impossible) and whatever is set as a default value it will always need to be changed to match the design you want to achieve.

    Saying Fireworks doesn’t support ‘retina’ is a misnomer as ‘retina’ is a method of implementation not a feature of any app or IDE. Fireworks has probably the best render engine out there and when you extend it this includes vector based options like SVG and images optimized for retina displays.

    As for interoperability, if you click Edit > Copy as Vectors, you can paste a vector shape into basically any app you like.

    HTH

  16. Ramikey says:

    agree with you on the animation issue.
    tried a lot kind of application, mac and pc and couldn’t find the right prototype app that can simulate modern animation effects.
    still waiting…

  17. OthMane says:

    As a freelance designer, I think will never replace Photoshop or Fireworks. The Synergie between Adobe products is really useful. And all clients I work with are using Photoshop (some of them are still using Gimp).
    The fact that it’s a Mac-only soft, is another factor, because the majority of developers are Windows user.
    For all this reasons, and many others Sketch won’t be THE UI design software.
    Sadly, because the 100% vector approach is awesome I guess. The CSS export feature works more than well, and it’s much more easier to use than Photoshop / Fireworks.

  18. Angel says:

    I think that Fireworks is the best app for ui and mobile design but it crash too much when you use more than 10 pages.
    I hope that Adobe update the App and become the best tool for user interface design. There are many designers waiting for a new version of the program without many bugs and real improvements. Do not even know if it continues its development …

  19. Ryan says:

    I, too, have been a fireworks user all the way back to the MacroMedia days. I recently switched from Fireworks to Sketch and honestly don’t think I’ll look back.

    My last mobile design project in Fireworks was continuously interrupted by CS6 crashes (checked the forums for complaints about memory issues). So much so that I started blindly looking for alternatives (I haven’t ever been a Photoshop user, and never was able to be passionate about Illustrator).

    When I found Sketch randomly, I also discovered that it’s so new there aren’t even a lot of resources or discussions about it (glad I found this one).

    I won’t go into all the technical comparisons, which seem to be covered well in this post. All I’ll say about my experience so far is that it reminds me of the feeling I had when I switched from PC to Mac years ago. My initial thought was, “well, it won’t do X and where’s Y?” But, after a very short amount of time I realized I had been conditioned to expect those things, even if I really never needed or used them.

    So for me it’s been a refreshing new experience to strip out all the unnecessary stuff and start with a fresh tool that’s very simple in nature, but has everything I need to accomplish my goals.

  20. Sketch VS Fireworks by @MengTo: http://t.co/ImK1WfOPyB

  21. Kurt says:

    In 2006 I did a job for a client in Berlin. They refused to accept PSDs and would only accept Fireworks PNGs, before then I had never even opened the app. Needless to say it was a steep initial learning curve and I hated it at first. But as I became accustomed to what Fireworks could do I began to love it immensely and have used it as my default UX/GUI/Web tool of choice ever since.

    Hello Sketch!

    Same thing happened with Sketch. This time round I chose to try it out. I hated it, so much so, I deleted it.

    But a few jobs came my way, iPhone and web work and I thought I’d download it again from the MAS and give it another bash.

    Now I love it.

    It isn’t perfect, it has bugs, but so does Fireworks, many years after it was purchased with Marcromedia.

    What I learnt was that Sketch is different and that change is the greatest challenge.

    Why should you use it? Because you choose to, there is no better reason. If you want to stay with Fireworks, cool, but Sketch is nicer.

    Have fun.

    Meng To: Superb blog and work, thank you.

  22. Kurt says:

    As for animation I use Keynote and Hype for prototyping. It is not ideal, but it works. Clients and the dev team do appreciate it (do it in the wireframe stage and then simply replace the graphics for presentation. With Sketch’s slice export tool and Keynote it works a treat.

    Keynote can export to an interactive PDF to demo on an iPhone and Hype creates an HTML5 package that can be used in Safari/Chrome fullscreen on iPhone or even an iBook (I have not played with iBooks yet).

    Animation takes time, so budget for it.

  23. [...] Sketch VS Fireworks or Sketch VS Photoshop (Written by Meng To) [...]

  24. Rob says:

    Good read. Thanks for your insight.

    I was ridiculed back in the late 90s for beta testing Macromedia’s Fireworks. My friends and colleagues thought I was insane for insisting Fireworks was an adequate graphic design tool. Well it’s 2013 and I am still using Fireworks, but less and less. Lately, I have been using Sketch and CSS3 to point where Fireworks sometimes goes a whole week without a single startup.

    I don’t feel the need to discuss what I feel are the shortcomings and strengths of either Sketch or Fireworks as they have already been mentioned. Fireworks is a mature product and as such it is overall more capable than Sketch. This cannot really be disputed.

    At the same time, Adobe is not putting the same effort into Fireworks that BC is putting into Sketch. The improvements made in Sketch 2 have been very exciting indeed. Whereas Fireworks, since Adobe assimilated it, has really only received minor improvements and still largely feels like a web tool from 15 years ago.

    Sketch is sometimes limited, but working in the environment feels so liberating. Everything is so fast and fluid that it’s simply a pleasure for me to use. The small shop nature of Sketch is wonderful too, such was the case with Macromedia as well. But Adobe feels more like a bank than friendly group of creatives.

    Adobe seems more interested these days in fleshing out their subscription services and their, temporarily, free edge tools. Seeing as many of these new Edge tools are very snappy and possess a modern app feeling and work through while Fireworks slowly trudges on suffering from many of the same problems (crashes, memory paging limitations, typography issues, etc..) I worry about Fireworks’ future. Sketch on the other hand, seems vibrant and very alive.

    Although I am not ready to make the switch exclusively to Sketch from Fireworks I will continue to look for reasons to open up Sketch and do my work there.

    Thanks again for your article.

    Best wishes

  25. Miles says:

    I would buy Sketch tomorrow if they did a Windows version. They would be mad not to consider it with the news today that Adobe are going to discontinue Fireworks.

  26. @tkt523 says:

    Sketch VS Fireworks by @MengTo: http://t.co/aQSgtb9KdK

  27. @MadeInVolta says:

    Ud qué usa para diseñar interfaces? Fireworks? Conoce Sketch? http://t.co/XGjIKQoIKE

  28. @paularufi some tips here… http://t.co/zeVfISgGo4

  29. [...] Switch To Sketch was written because I was asked to write a “Get Started” article for Sketch. Photoshop vs Fireworks was written because many felt that Fireworks was a good alternative to Photoshop. I had to compare [...]

  30. @gustomela says:

    Sketch VS Fireworks | Meng To|UI/UX Designer http://t.co/pnBSxlEZmx

  31. Miles, I agree. I too would buy Sketch without hesitating if there was a Windows version.

  32. Mike says:

    Sketch is wonderful. I’m switching from Fireworks and loving every minute of it!

  33. Dave Barnes says:

    Given that Adobe is dropping Fireworks, Sketch wins.

  34. vic says:

    hi,

    Just started with sketch and found your site when searching about how to transfer vector assets to keynote.
    You also mentioned that vectors can be used in keynote, but can’t find how.

    Have been using svg2keynote & eazyDraw for that but would love if you can point out how to get this done in sketch.

  35. Ryan says:

    You may have already found this tool by Adobe, but I like Edge Animate. It may have more formative web design tools, but it can work for really anything, I found. It’s really great for creating instant animations and may help solve your animation issue.

    Also, I am a daily Sketch user.

  36. Adam says:

    Sketch is nice but it can’t do half the things Fireworks can do. Now that Fireworks has been cancelled, I’m hunting for an alternative but finding that nothing can truely replace it.

    When I’m doing design work for web and social, I need access to rapid construction of both vector and raster materials and Fireworks had unprecidented ways of using them both together, importing or exporting to either and rapidly modifying objects in non-destructive ways. Handy tools like “paste as mask” were fun as well.

    I found it more useful and intuitive than Photoshop or Illustrator and used it to do a lot of the work from either of those apps in a fraction of the time.

    They should have strenghtened Fireworks instead of killing it. With a little support for colour profiles and print work, and optimizations to the performance and interface, it could have been a killer app.

    Now I’m likely going to have to run 4 or 5 different apps if I want to get away from Adobe’s new way of business. Sketch might be one I use for the vector-only stuff but it’s a pest when I’m doing certain kinds of work or want to do the types of masking effects I’m accustomed to.

    Fireworks was well worth the price compared to the through-the-nose overcharging of some of the other apps that were essentially one trick ponies.

    I like 50 bucks better though, or the 15 bucks for pixelmator.

    I’d actually love if Sketch and Pixelmator had a child that contained my fave fireworks features instead of forcing me to jump through hoops to do what I want to do.

  37. [...] In preparation for Adobe killing Fireworks, I’ve been using Sketch over the last few months. Today, it’s $25 on the iTunes store (usually $50) <- HT @verbiate. Also, check out Meng To’s, Sketch vs Fireworks write up.  [...]

  38. [...] vs Photoshop — http://blog.mengto.com/sketch-vs-photoshop/ Sketch vs Fireworks — http://blog.mengto.com/sketch-vs-fireworks/ The Best Hidden Features In [...]

  39. Edwin says:

    Hi Guys

    I´ve arrived to this page looking for an app that could help me instead Fireworks. I´ve used AF since it was a Macromedia Product (I don´t remember but I think it was Fireworks 8, the last launched from MM). The reason: 290 USD without support from this year is wasted money for me and Im not agree with creative cloud subscription model. Few months ago I´ve installed Pixelmator but I´ve uninstalled it in the first day when I bought the product because is not possible to draw a box (or circle, or line, or whatever) with pixel precision. Now, I will try Sketch to compare with Fireworks.

  40. coolcfan says:

    One simple thing: when you zoom it in 8x, you see pixels, and you can clearly adjust your object in pixel level. If you zoom it in 8x and still see vectors, how do you do such adjustment?

  41. Nik says:

    @Meng To: I have used Fireworks for more than an hour.

    F##ng idiot :)))

  42. Mic says:

    I know this is almost a year old blog but nothing changed since. FW is the same and the latest Sketch version is more or less the same or even worse then before.
    I use FW on daily basis since version 2 and can’t work on anything else. Yes, it’s buggy and has some odd UI issues but those are legacy issues from when it was owned by Macromedia and used SWF files as part of it’s UI (hence it bugs and issues today).
    The amount of useful and truly web oriented tools that FW uses are far greater then Sketch and once you start using your own libraries, styles, colour schemes, templates etc., master page and various 3rd party scripts you will be creating wireframes and designs much quicker and pixel precisely.
    PS is and was always the wrong tool for web. AI is nice but was never designed for web as well. InDesign actually is very good for prototyping and wire-framing if you know what you’re doing.

    I will use FW as long as I can. there is really no other tool and Adobe are missing the plot here IMO.
    Cheers

  43. [...] Sketch vs. Fireworks by Meng To. [...]

  44. shaolin says:

    For the reason that the admin of this site is working, no doubt very shortly it will be well-known, due to its quality contents.

  45. Roark says:

    Yes, it’s almost a crime against humanity for Adobe to just sit on Fireworks. (I was so excited when they introduced LiveMotion to compete with Flash but after purchasing it, they just up and killed it. There outta be a class action suit for this sort of behavior on these software conglomerates part.)

    Anyway, it’s very encouraging to see so many people speak out in strong favor of (and admiration for) Fireworks!

    I’ve been fond of Fireworks since long before Adobe acquired it through their take over of Macromedia.

    Photoshop is fine for what it does (photo touch up and effects) and the same is true about Illustrator (pure vector).

    Fireworks offers a unique experience, supporting both bitmaps and vectors, letting you work with both in the same application.

    I also find Fireworks to just be easier to use than Photoshop as it has a more natural feel to it, allowing one to create multiple objects on the same layer and being able to select and move them just with a simple click and drag of the mouse.

    Whereas Photoshop, is much more rigid in its use of layers and I find myself sticking to using just one object per layer, but also find the layering cumbersome in Photoshop, having to select the layer first, for example, before moving an object (the one exception being, you can hold down the CTRL key).

    Anyway, I would have to say that the word LOVE enters my mind when it comes to using Fireworks.

    Up until recently I have been a mostly Windows (PC) sort of guy, but now I look forward to using Pixelmator and Sketch as well as Hype (all 3 only available for Mac) on my new Mac Mini with OSX Mavericks.

    Now if I can just decide whether to upgrade to Adobe CS6 for Mac or PC (I currently have CS5.5 for Windows but Adobe lets you switch platforms when you upgrade). Uggh this decision is a tough one..

    Viva La Fireworks!

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